About the Major

Physics is the study of matter and energy, from the smallest scale (elementary particles) to the largest (evolution of stars and galaxies). In this sense, physics is foundational to all other sciences. As a physics student, you'll solve technical problems by learning to analyze complex relationships in mathematical terms. Because of this broad-based and flexible problem-solving background, physics graduates find employment in a wide variety of specialty areas and fields, some of which are not directly associated with physics.

Skills and abilities this major develops include: data acquisition and analysis, math skills, problem solving, laboratory methods, computer skills, understanding theoretical concepts, and technical writing.

Quick Facts

Sample Coursework

  • Calculus 1, 2, and 3
  • Differential equations
  • Mechanics
  • Heat electricity and optics
  • Modern physics
  • Thermal and statistical physics
  • Physical optics
  • Quantum mechanics

 

Possible Careers

  • Intelligence analyst
  • Quality control and testing
  • Quantum technology scientist
  • Scientific programmer
  • Patent examiner*
  • Postsecondary teacher*

*These careers require further education or training.

Where could I work?

  • Dow AgroSciences
  • Eli Lilly and Company
  • Heart Center of Indiana
  • Lancaster Laboratories
  • Naval Criminal Investigative Services (NCIS)
  • Raytheon Company

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Cluster

This major belongs to the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) cluster. The STEM cluster is the academic home of University College students pursuing majors in the sciences, technology, engineering, informatics, and computing. The STEM cluster partners with students on their academic advising and career plans to guide them into their degree-granting schools.

Learn about the STEM cluster

Learn about other clusters

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